[SOLVED] P1183 Code: Fix Engine Oil Temperature Sensor Circuit Malfunction Now!

The automobile fault code P1183 indicates that the engine is not at operating temperature. This can be identified by the Engine Light being ON or the Service Engine Soon Warning Light being illuminated.

The possible causes for this issue include a stuck thermostat in the cooling system, a faulty Engine Oil Temperature (EOT) sensor, an open or shorted EOT sensor harness, poor electrical connection in the EOT sensor circuit, or a faulty Engine Control Module (ECM). To fix this problem, you should visually inspect the wiring harness and connectors, checking for any damage or corrosion. Additionally, look for any broken, bent, pushed out, or corroded pins in the connectors.

The repair time for this issue is estimated to be 1.0.

Repair Importance Level10.0 (Out of 10)
Estimated Repair TimeApproximately 1.0 hour
Repair Difficulty Level6.67 (Out of 10)

When the engine light is on or the service engine soon warning light is illuminated, it could be a sign of the p1183 fault code.

  • The symptoms of the automobile fault code P1183 include the Engine Light being ON or the Service Engine Soon Warning Light being illuminated.

The automobile fault code P1183 can be caused by various factors, including engine temperature, cooling system issues, sensor malfunctions, and problems with the engine control module.

  • The fault code P1183 can be caused by the following: engine not at operating temperature, stuck thermostat in the cooling system, faulty Engine Oil Temperature (EOT) sensor, open or shorted EOT sensor harness, poor electrical connection in the EOT sensor circuit, and a faulty Engine Control Module (ECM).

To resolve the p1183 fault code, start by visually inspecting the wiring harness, connectors, and components for any damage or corrosion.

  • To fix the automobile fault code P1183, start by checking the possible causes mentioned above.
  • Then, visually inspect the wiring harness and connectors related to the issue.
  • Look for any damaged components and check for broken, bent, pushed out, or corroded connector pins.
  • This fix is estimated to take approximately 1.0 hour.

The automobile fault code P1183 can be diagnosed and fixed within an estimated repair time of 1.0 hour.

The cost of the repair will depend on the hourly rate charged by the auto repair shop, which typically ranges between $75 and $150 per hour.

The P1183 fault code refers to a malfunction in the engine oil temperature sensor circuit. This sensor is a thermistor device that measures the temperature of the engine oil. It works by changing its resistance based on the temperature, which in turn affects the voltage drop across the sensor terminals.

This voltage signal is then sent to the Engine Control Module (ECM) to provide information about the oil temperature. The EOT sensor is typically threaded into the engine oil lubrication system. It plays a crucial role in various functions of the ECM.

For example, on variable cam timing (VCT) applications, the EOT input is used to adjust the VCT control gains and logic for camshaft timing. Additionally, the ECM can use the EOT sensor input along with other inputs to determine oil degradation and initiate a soft engine shutdown if the oil temperature becomes too high.

This helps prevent engine damage. When the P1183 fault code is triggered, it indicates that there is a problem with the engine oil temperature sensor circuit.

This could be due to a faulty sensor, a wiring issue, or a problem with the ECM itself. It is important to address this issue promptly to ensure proper engine performance and prevent potential damage.

What are the possible causes of fault code P1183 in an automobile?

If you’re seeing the fault code P1183 in your automobile, it could be due to a few different causes. One possibility is that your engine is not at the correct operating temperature. Another potential cause could be a problem with the cooling system, such as a stuck thermostat. It’s also worth checking the Engine Oil Temperature (EOT) sensor and its wiring harness for any issues, such as being open or shorted. Lastly, a faulty Engine Control Module (ECM) could be to blame. To fix the issue, start by visually inspecting the wiring harness and connectors, checking for any damage or corrosion.

How can I determine if the engine is not at operating temperature when the P1183 fault code is triggered?

If you see the Engine Light ON or the Service Engine Soon Warning Light, it could be due to the engine not being at operating temperature. This can be caused by a stuck thermostat in the cooling system, a faulty Engine Oil Temperature (EOT) sensor, an open or shorted EOT sensor harness, a poor electrical connection in the EOT sensor circuit, or a faulty Engine Control Module (ECM). To fix this issue, visually inspect the wiring harness and connectors, checking for any damage or broken pins.

What steps should I take to visually inspect the wiring harness and connectors when troubleshooting fault code P1183?

To visually inspect the wiring harness and connectors when troubleshooting fault code P1183, start by checking the possible causes listed above. Then, visually inspect the related wiring harness and connectors. Look for any damaged components and check for broken, bent, pushed out, or corroded connector pins. This thorough inspection will help identify any issues with the wiring harness and connectors that may be causing the fault code.

p1183 error fault code explained

If your engine light is on and you’re experiencing issues with your engine temperature, it could be due to a few different causes. First, check if your engine is not at operating temperature. If that’s not the issue, it could be a problem with your cooling system, such as a stuck thermostat.

Another possibility is a faulty Engine Oil Temperature (EOT) sensor or a problem with the sensor’s harness or circuit.

Lastly, it could be a fault with the Engine Control Module (ECM). To fix the problem, visually inspect the wiring harness and connectors for any damage.

Look out for broken, bent, pushed out, or corroded pins on the connectors.

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